Jitish Kallat: Anger at the Speed of Fright, 2010, courtesy: Jitish Kallat
Jitish Kallat: Anger at the Speed of Fright, 2010, courtesy: Jitish Kallat

Riots: Slow Cancellation of the Future

On Riots and Resistance

 

"The learning process is something you can incite, literally incite, like a riot."
– Audre Lorde

 The riot is an extra-ordinary setting that has played a pivotal role in the permanent confrontation between dissent and power over centuries. The deeper crises of capitalism, racial violence, and communal tensions have convulsed us into "an age of riots" [1]. As master fictions of the sovereign nation-state implode and hegemonic silencing of the dispossessed only serves to reveal the cracks in governability, the exhibition "Riots: Slow Cancellation of the Future" brings together artistic works and research positions from across the world in an endeavour to "sense" and chronicle recent riots and uprisings – evoking a phenomenology of the multitude.[2]

In 1960 Elias Canetti wrote, "One of the most striking traits of the inner life of a crowd is the feeling of being persecuted." [3] However, what happens when state forces instigate persecution from within the crowd? The riot is a transformative ground that often becomes a decisive sequence within prolonged conflict – in the shape of mass rebellions, anti-colonial struggle, civil war, and genocide. And yet the riot has tended to remain that unresolved chapter, strategically buried in the subconscious of divided cities.

Ala Younis: Pat—riot—against the slow cancellation of the future, 2018, research image, courtesy: Ala Younis
Jitish Kallat: Anger at the Speed of Fright, 2010, courtesy: Jitish Kallat
Karrabing Film Collective: The Jealous One (Filmstill), 2017, courtesy: Karrabing Film Collective
Dilip Gaonkar and Liam Mayes, Riot After Riot: Real and Imagined (Still), 2018, scene from Pontecorvo, et al. Battle of Algiers. Santa Monica, CA, Rhino Home Video, (1966) 1993, courtesy the artists
Orijit Sen: One May Seek Him in Mekka, One May Search for Him in Kashi… I Have Found my Beloved, Should I Not Embrace Him?, 1993, Poster für Anhad Garje "In Defense of Our Secular Tradition", courtesy: SAHMAT
Chto Delat: Knowledge Is Power, 2011, from the series ‘Learning Flags’, photo: KOW, Berlin, courtesy: Chto Delat; KOW, Berlin
Satch Hoyt: Riot, 2014, photo credit: Trevor Lloyd Morgan, courtesy: Satch Hoyt
Glenn Ligon: Untitled (Condition Report for Black Rage), 2015, photo: Tom Powel Imaging; © Glenn Ligon, courtesy: Glenn Ligon; Luhring Augustine, New York; Regen Projects, Los Angeles; Thomas Dane Gallery, London
Chandraguptha Thenuwara: Untitled I, 2014, courtesy: Chandraguptha Thenuwara, Saskia Fernando Gallery
Gauri Gill: Shaheedi Memorial Museum, Tilak Vihar. September 2014, from the '1984 notebooks', courtesy: Gauri Gill
Daniel Joseph Martinez: A Meditation on the Possibility of Romantic Love; or, Where You Goin‘ with That Gun in Your Hand, 2005, courtesy: Daniel Joseph Martinez; Roberts Projects, Los Angeles
Louis Henderson, research image for ”Evidence of Things Unseen but Heard”, 2018, photographic negatives of the St. Paul's Riots 1980, courtesy: Bristol Archives, ref. 43129/Lib/StP/1/1/2
John Akomfrah: Riot (film still), 1999, © Smoking Dogs Films, courtesy: Lisson Gallery
Natascha Sadr Haghighian: Fuel to the Fire, 2016, installation view, Tensta Konsthall 2016, photo: Jean-Baptiste Beranger, courtesy: Natascha Sadr Haghighian

1 Joshua Clover, Riot. Strike. Riot: The New Era of Uprisings (London and New York: Verso, 2016).
2 Dilip Gaonkar, "After the Fictions: Notes Towards a Phenomenology of the Multitude", e-flux Journal, 58 (October 2014).
3 Elias Canetti, Crowds and Power (London: Phoenix, 2000), pp. 20–21.

 

 

ifa Gallery Stuttgart

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70173 Stuttgart
Phone +49.711.2225.173
alber(at)ifa.de

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Closed on Mondays and on holidays

27 April – 24 June 2018

Events

ifa Gallery Berlin

Linienstraße 139/140
D-10115 Berlin
Phone +49.30.284491.40
fischer(at)ifa.de

Tuesdays – Sundays 2 – 6 p.m.
Closed on Mondays and on holidays

26 January – 1 April 2018