In the Carpet | Über den Teppich

Anni Albers: Black White Grey, 1927; tapestry, silk and cotton, 155 x 120 cm; Neues Museum Nuremberg; © on loan from the city of nuremberg, The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, © (Anni Albers) VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2016, photo: Neues Museum Nuremberg (A.
Anni Albers: Black White Grey, 1927; tapestry, silk and cotton, 155 x 120 cm; Neues Museum Nuremberg; © on loan from the city of nuremberg, The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, © (Anni Albers) VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2016, photo: Neues Museum Nuremberg (A. Kradisch)

When Anni Albers (*1899, Berlin – 1994 Orange, CT) joined the Bauhaus weaving studio in 1922 she was first shocked by the conventional techniques and limited artistic opportunities she encountered there. This led her to formulate her own ambitious project to alter the art of weaving in her own personal way, making it more serious and more professional. She wanted a new start with a new aesthetics. Both Anni and Josef Albers shared an interest in abstraction and a love of materials and techniques. She developed a style that was completely free of everything in weaving that people said was “typically feminine”. She transformed weaving into abstract art. After she emigrated from Nazi Germany to the USA, Albers taught what she had learned at the Bauhaus and her own personal style of weaving at the Black Mountain College in North Carolina. In connection with traditional Mexican art she came to concentrate on what she saw as the key moments in the manufacturing process as part of a creative artistic process.

2016
La Boîte de Pandore: Une autre photographie par Jan Dibbets, Musée d’Art Moderne, Paris
From the Collection: 1960-1969, Museum of Modern Art, New York 

2015
Das Bauhaus. #allesistdesign, Vitra Design Museum, Weil am Rhein
Leap Before You Look Back. Black Mountain College 1933–1957, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston
A Beautiful Confluence. Anni and Josef Albers and the Latin American World, Museo delle Culture, Milano 

2014
Celebrating the Spectrum. Highlights from the Anderson Collection, de Young Museum, San Francisco 

2013
Art & Textiles. Fabric as Material and Concept in Modern Art from Klimt to the Present, Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg
Decorum. Tapis et tapisseries d'artistes, Musée d'Art moderne de la Ville de Paris
Designing Modern Women 1890–1990, Museum of Modern Art, New York 

2012
Bauhaus. Art as Life, Barbican Art Gallery, London 

2010
Anni Albers. Prints and Studies, Alan Cristea Gallery, London
Colouring in the Clinical, Menier Gallery, London 

Amina Agueznay: Draa ala draa, variations on a Menchar motive, 2016; wool, 50 x 50 cm;  © Amina Agueznay, courtesy of the artist
Anonymous: Zemmour, Middle Atlas, about 1940, wool and cotton, 175 x 111 cm; © Rabii Alouani Bibi collection
Taysir Batniji: Hannoun, 1972-2009; performance / installation, crayon chippings; colour photograph / inkjet print on paper, 150 x 100 cm; designed and realised at the ‘Palestine c/o Venice’ exhibition at the 53th Venice Biennial, 2009; © courtesy of
Anni Albers: Black White Grey, 1927; tapestry, silk and cotton, 155 x 120 cm; Neues Museum Nuremberg; © on loan from the city of nuremberg, The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, © (Anni Albers) VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2016, photo: Neues Museum Nuremberg (A.
Saâdane Afif: La Leçon de géométrie: the motive (C3_p002) / prototype, 2015; knotted wool, 134 x 200 cm, carbon print on paper, on sandwich panel, 119 x 86 cm; © courtesy of the artist, photo: V. Tomaschko
Mosta Maftah: Feu en Océan, 1979; wool, silk threads, cotton, 85 x 160 cm © courtesy of the artist and Thinkart
Mohammed Melehi: untitled, 1936; acrylic on canvas, 153 x 127 cm; © courtesy of the artist; © (Mohammed Melehi) VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2016
Gunta Stölzl: Draft with Two-Ply Fabric, draft 1926; wool, 77 x 303 cm, limited edition; © courtesy of the ifa, photo: A. Körner, bildhübsche Fotografie
Yto Barrada: untitled (realised in cooperation with the Darnas weaving workshop for women), 2014; hand-woven wool, 172 x 195 cm; © courtesy of the artist and the Sfeir-Semler Gallery Hamburg / Beirut
Sheila Hicks: prayer rug, 1974, wool, 221 x 121,9 x 8,3 cm; © courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York
Ida Kerkovius: Landscape, about 1927; hand-woven carpet, 125 x 135; © on loan from the Kunstmuseum Stuttgart, photo: A. Körner, bildhübsche Fotografie
Rudolf Lutz: tapestry, draft 1918; wool, ca. 93 x 80 cm; © courtesy of the ifa, photo: A. Körner, bildhübsche Fotografie