Future Perfect. Contemporary Art from Germany
Henrik Olesen: A.T., 2012; computer collage on card, 20 sheets; photo: Lothar Schnepf; © Henrik Olesen; Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne, Courtesy: Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne

The work of Henrik Olesen looks at the themes of cropping, omission, and connection in a body-based political context. The work addresses our own bodies and the bodies of others, as well as the production of bodies and the space around them. Henrik Olesen (born 1967 in Esbjerg, Denmark) has devoted several groups of works to the inventor of the binary code and computer pioneer Alan Turing (1912–1954). In his collage edition "A.T." (2012), Olesen illustrates the brutal and tragic effect of the transfer of binary abstraction onto the mathematician’s physical and mental integrity. Turing undertook significant basic research for information and computer technology and also theoretical biology. During World War II he played a key role in decoding German radio signals. In 1952 he was forced into psychiatric treatment due to his homosexuality, and "chemically castrated." He was no longer permitted to work for the secret service, suffered from depression, and finally committed suicide. It was only in 2009 that the then British premier minister, Gordon Brown, issued an official apology on behalf of the government, saying that Alan Turing was "treated terribly."

Photo
A.T., 2012; computer collage on card, 20 sheets; photo: Lothar Schnepf; © Henrik Olesen; Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne, Courtesy: Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne