Two German Architectures 1949-1989

The State

Following the post-war foundation of the two German states in 1949 – first the Federal Repbulic of Germany from the three Western Allied Occupation Zones and then the German Democratic Republic on the territory of the former Soviet Zone – the architects on both sides were confronted with the difficult task of developing distinctly different national forms of state representation. The public buildings in one German state had to distinguish themselves from those of the other. While the Federal Repbulic formally broke with the monumental architectural style of the perished Third Reich symbolically to emphasize a new beginning, the GDR believed in continuing to follow architectural traditions precisely because of its radical change in the political system. In bothe East and West Germany, the claim to represent sovereign states, and a new beginning in modesty, impeded any copying of representative building styles of the victors.

Capital Cities

Residence and reception building of the Federal Chancellor, Bonn; 1963 – 1964; architect: Sep Ruf

Residence and reception building of the Federal Chancellor, Bonn

Bonn, 1963–1964
Architect: Sep Ruf

Palace of the Republic: People's Chamber, public foyer and large multi-purpose hall, Berlin-Mitte; 1972–1976; architects: Heinz Graffunder with Wolf R. Eisentraut, Karl-Ernst Swora, Günter Kunert, Manfred Prasser,  Heinz Aust, Dieter Bankert

Palace of the Republic: People's Chamber, public foyer and large multi-purpose hall, Berlin

Berlin-Mitte, 1972–1976
Architects: Heinz Graffunder with Wolf R. Eisentraut, Karl-Ernst Swora, Günter Kunert, Manfred Prasser,  Heinz Aust, Dieter Bankert

Plenary Hall of the parliament of the Federal Republic, Bonn; 1987 – 1992; architects: Günther Behnisch & Partner

Plenary Hall of the parliament of the Federal Republic, Bonn

Bonn, 1987–1992
Architects: Günther Behnisch & Partner

Embassy of the USSR, Berlin-Mitte, 1948 – 1951; architects: Anatoli Jakowlewitsch Stryshewski / Friedrich Skujin / D.D. Lebedinskij / Sichert

Embassy of the USSR, Berlin

Berlin-Mitte, 1948–1951
Architects: Anatoli Jakowlewitsch Stryshewski, Friedrich Skujin, D.D. Lebedinskij, Sichert

International Representation

German Pavilion at the World Exposition of 1958, Brussels; 1956 – 1958; architects: Egon Eiermann / Sep Ruf

German Pavilion at the World Exposition of 1958, Brussels

Brussels, 1956–1958
Architects: Egon Eiermann, Sep Ruf

Radio and Television

Television Tower Stuttgart; 1954 – 1956; Design: Fritz Leonhardt

Television Tower Stuttgart

Stuttgart, 1954–1956
Design: Fritz Leonhardt
Artistic director and construction manager: Erwin Heinle

Television Tower Berlin; 1964–1969; Architects: Fritz Dieter, Günter Franke

Television Tower Berlin

Berlin, 1964–1969
Architects: Fritz Dieter, Günter Franke
Civil engineer: Werner Ahrendt
Design of spherical skin: Werner Neumann
Interior design: Hans Lepak, Ursula Schneider
Artistic consultant: Hermann Henselmann
Pavilions housing the exhibition centre, 1969-1972
Architects: Walter Herzog, Heinz Aust, Rolf Heider